Keep the kid dry

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I shot this near the end of November on a rainy Saturday walkabout through Chinatown. I saw this little child in the covered stroller and thought it was the cutest thing. They passed me so I had to sort of get ahead of them and then wait for them to pass again to get the shot.

I had the Fuji 14/2.8 prime lens on my camera, which isn’t great at AF in low light, and I didn’t have time to change my settings, which is why the shot is a tad blurry. I shot it at f8 and 1/110th of a second shutter. Had I opened up the aperture to f4 (two stops brighter) it would have increased my shutter speed to somewhere around 1/400th a second, assuming the ISO remained at 3200. That would have frozen the movement nicely.

Thankfully, when it comes to street photography, I’m not a believer that your photographs have to come out tack sharp every time. Sure, I always try for sharp but I’m not about to dismiss a photo because of a little motion blur, unless it’s drastically unappealing. Even thought this image is clearly blurry, I think it still works, thanks to the subject matter.

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Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, Chinatown, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, Rain, Reflections, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lazy Photographer Book – Book Flip

 

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube_2

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (1)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (2)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (3)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (4)

Lazy Photographer Book Update:

So I finally received my copy of my new book “Theses Days Will Pass.” I really like how it came out. Upgrading to the 100# premium luster was definitely the right call. You can follow the link below to a YouTube video I made of a book flip of my book (where I flip through some of the pages for you). Keep in mind that the video is more contrasty than the book itself. Let me know what you think.

This copy comes in at 178 pages, but that brings it to around $115 bucks a book. With the help of a couple of photographers I really respect I plan to whittle it down to 140 pages, which will bring the cost down to under $90 a book, before taxes and shipping. As much as I’d love to keep the book as it is, I really don’t want to break that $100 dollar threshold.

You can watch the book flip video here: BookFlip

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, Cars, Cats, City, Documentary Photography, Dogs, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, Kensington Market, Little India, Little Italy, Night Photography, Parks, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, Ryerson School of Imaging, St. Lawrence Market, street, Street Photography, streetcar, The Danforth, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography, Winter Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

US Dollars Valid Here

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Here’s a young artist hard at work out front of the Eaton Centre. I shot this a full week or so back and then saw him there Saturday morning when I was heading out for my walkabout. After a long day out I returned only to find him still there and still painting away. I’m not sure how many hours we was out but for sure it was over six. That’s a long time in this cold weather. He must enjoy what he’s doing, or at least enjoy the money coming in.

 

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Kensington Market

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We had some beautiful weather here in Toronto yesterday. It was around +11 C and somewhat sunny. My buddies and I walked to Kensington Market for a little Sunday shooting. This guy is one of the most difficult dudes to photograph at the Market. The moment he even sees you with your camera he’ll turn his back to you until you’re gone. Simply, he does not like his photo taken. While I totally understand and share his dislike of being photographed, the fact he makes such an effort to avoid it only makes it a challenge for me. So I saw him out front of his store having a smoke and as I walked by I faced the storefronts opposite him, so as to appear that I hadn’t even taken notice of his side of the street. When I got the the spot I knew I needed to be for this photo, I turned and quickly raised my camera to my eye and fired off a single shot. He immediately spun around and put his back to me, but I was quicker on the draw. It was a satisfying capture.

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Kensington Market, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Good Samaritan

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This old Asian woman was crossing the street but she was too slow and the light changed against her, so this cyclists road along side her to ensure the cars waiting to go would be aware there was someone still crossing. It was such a nice thing to watch. When they made it to where I was standing I told the cyclist she was a good person, which she is.

Posted in art, Autumn, Canada, Chinatown, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rainy Saturday Cyclist

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Got out for a walk in the rain today. Threw on my wide angle prime, the Fuji 14/2.8. Nice lens but man it’s slow at AF. And it misses entirely at times. Fortunately this shot came out as planned. Hope you like it. Happy Saturday.

Posted in art, Autumn, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, Rain, Reflections, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Turned Around

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I really don’t know what to call this photo. Anyway, I snapped this during the World Press Photo Gallery exhibition down at Brookfield Place back in October. Things sort of lined up perfectly. 

Hope you’ve been keeping well. I sort of forgot about the blog for a couple of weeks. I’ll try to keep it a little more updated going forward. Have a great weekend. 

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Third wheel

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I snapped this during my last Pedestrian Sunday outing at Kensington Market. It was a shot from my day of talking to strangers I’d normally not bother with. My experience is when you come across a group of street people hanging out, there’s always one in the crowd who wants to impress his/her friends by telling you to fuck off when you approach for a photo. And the larger the group, the more likely you’ll be told where to go.

In this case there was maybe five people in this group. I walked up and offered to feed their change can if they allowed me to take a shot. They were all quite nice about it. I started talking to the couple of they told me they’d just arrived from Vancouver. When I started photographing them, they began to make out, which was rather funny. I thought it worked well.

What I really like about this shot is the story it suggests leaves little to the imagination. Contrary to popular belief, I don’t think photographs tell stories, for the most part.

Instead, good images usually elicit an emotional response of some sort. They also tend to be somewhat ambiguous and it’s that ambiguity that sparks the imagination and invites the viewer to create their own story. So basically, you end up with two stories, the one from the point of view of the photographer who was there and the one that the viewer of the image creates to try to resolve the ambiguity of the image. But the image itself, even with photojournalism, does not actually “tell” a story. It merely suggests possibilities, like an open ended sentence. The viewer writes the story, and often the story they write is not what’s actually happening in the photograph.

But that’s okay. Good photographs spark the imagination. Poor photographs are usually not worth a seconds glance, because they lack a compelling reason to engage your imagination.

I should qualify this by saying I’m talking about a single image, not a series of images that make up a photo essay. Photo essays do lead the viewer down a path that tells a story (hopefully). Anyway, that’s my take on it. I’m working on an article titled Picture Don’t Tell Stories, where I expand on this idea.

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Kensington Market, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment