Your meal is in transit

davidgeoffbacon-138-edit-edited

This show shutter pan shot came out pretty nice, if I do say so myself. I say slow shutter but that’s only compared to my go to shutter speed of 1/320th a second. This was captured at 1/80th a second, which is still pretty fast for a pan/blur shot. Usually you drop your shutter to around 1/30th a second for this sort of image. The idea is you move your camera at the same speed as your subject’s moving, so as to freeze the subject yet blur the background. The faster the shutter the less likely you’re get a nice blur. Anyway, I’m happy with the outcome. Hope you like it, too.

Advertisements
Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

John Wayne

ChristmasDay18-90-EDITED

I shot this on College St in Little Italy on Christmas day. Not sure what attracted me to it besides the painting, but since there were so few people out I was forced to shoot stuff I usually don’t bother with. Hope you like it.

Happy New Years and best wishes for an exciting and prosperous 2019. Thanks for all your support over the years.

Posted in art, Canada, Christmas, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Little Italy, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Bad Robots

ChristmasDay18-66-EDITED

I shot this on College St in Little Italy during my Christmas Day walkabout. Just thought it was a cute scene.

Posted in art, Canada, Christmas, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Little Italy, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Change is good

StrtPhotogVideoShoot-233-Edit-EDITED

I was watching another photographer shoot this homeless guy. The photographer took his shots from quite a distance and also from behind. Perhaps it’s just me, but I’m tired of the staggering number of street photographs of people from behind I keep seeing on FB and Instagram. This poor guy was asleep so there was really no reason for the photographer to be so afraid of getting close and shooting the man’s front side.

Anyway, I really had no intention of photographing him, but then this family crossed the street and the woman leaned over to see if there was coffee in the man’s cup, before she plunked some change in it. She then lead her children up to him to also drop change in his cup, which was nice to see. Such a teachable moment. I snapped this shot, along with a couple of the kids dropping in their change, but the photos of the kids didn’t work as well as this one.

Coincidentally, when I posted this to IG one of the family members saw it and commented on it, explaining what the woman was doing. Small world, eh?

Hope you all had a wonderful Christmas with family and friends. I ended up spending Christmas even at a close friend’s place, which was nice. On Christmas Day I headed downtown for a long walkabout with my camera, as I usually do on this day every year.

Best wishes for a prosperous new year.

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, Christmas, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cloudy Day Shades

StrtPhotogVideoShoot-47-Edit-EDITED

I didn’t really talk to this guy. Just pointed at my lens and then pointed at him and nodded. He nodded back and I snapped a couple of shots of him. Sometimes it’s better to have as little conversation as possible with your subject on the street. He intuitively understood that I wanted a candid photo of him, rather than one with him mugging for my camera. Had I chatted with him first, he likely would have given me more of a posed shot. After I got my photo I did chat with him a bit, since it no longer mattered.

The takeaway for street shooters: Tap your lens then point to the person and nod, and you’ll discover that everyone understands this as a non-verbal request to take their photo. Some will say something but most either nod back or shake their head. But most importantly, they’ll get that you don’t want them to stop whatever it is they are doing and that you’re trying to catch a candid moment.

If, however, you do want a posed shot, you’re probably best to engaged the person and explain what you want and why. Have a good reason, like how the colour of their jacket is such a nice contrast against the colour of the fence they are leaning against. Or mention something unique about them, such as an interesting hat or the cool sunglasses. If it’s a woman, don’t tell her you want the photo because of how beautiful she is. That’ll come off as creepy and she’ll likely turn you down.

The main thing is this: However you approach a stranger for a photograph, own it. Be absolutely 100% confident that you know what you’re doing and that this is a photo that demands to be taken. If you seem weak or afraid or shy, it’ll empower the subject and they’ll feel confident enough to say no.

So last Saturday my buddy and I were out shooting with a camera crew, creating a street photography video. Not sure how it’s going to come out but it was fun to do. If it’s good I’ll share it here. If not, pretend we never discussed it. ūüėČ

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Keep the kid dry

RainyNovSaturday-102-Edit-EDITED

I shot this near the end of November on a rainy Saturday walkabout through Chinatown. I saw this little child in the covered stroller and thought it was the cutest thing. They passed me so I had to sort of get ahead of them and then wait for them to pass again to get the shot.

I had the Fuji 14/2.8 prime lens on my camera, which isn’t great at AF in low light, and I didn’t have time to change my settings, which is why the shot is a tad blurry. I shot it at f8 and 1/110th of a second shutter. Had I opened up the aperture to f4 (two stops brighter) it would have increased my shutter speed to somewhere around 1/400th a second, assuming the ISO remained at 3200. That would have frozen the movement nicely.

Thankfully, when it comes to street photography, I’m not a believer that your photographs have to come out tack sharp every time. Sure, I always try for sharp but I’m not about to dismiss a photo because of a little motion blur, unless it’s drastically unappealing. Even thought this image is clearly blurry, I think it still works, thanks to the subject matter.

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, Chinatown, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, Rain, Reflections, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Lazy Photographer Book – Book Flip

 

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube_2

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (1)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (2)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (3)

The Lazy Photographer Book - BookFlip - YouTube (4)

Lazy Photographer Book Update:

So I finally received my copy of my new book “Theses Days Will Pass.” I really like how it came out. Upgrading to the 100# premium luster was definitely the right call. You can follow the link below to a YouTube video I made of a book flip of my book (where I flip through some of the pages for you). Keep in mind that the video is more contrasty than the book itself. Let me know what you think.

This copy comes in at 178 pages, but that brings it to around $115 bucks a book. With the help of a couple of photographers I really respect I plan to whittle it down to 140 pages, which will bring the cost down to under $90 a book, before taxes and shipping. As much as I’d love to keep the book as it is, I really don’t want to break that $100 dollar threshold.

You can watch the book flip video here: BookFlip

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, Cars, Cats, City, Documentary Photography, Dogs, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, Kensington Market, Little India, Little Italy, Night Photography, Parks, People, Photojournalism, Portrait Photography, Ryerson School of Imaging, St. Lawrence Market, street, Street Photography, streetcar, The Danforth, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography, Winter Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

US Dollars Valid Here

Dec01Downtown-3-Edit-EDITED

Here’s a young artist hard at work out front of the Eaton Centre. I shot this a full week or so back and then saw him there Saturday morning when I was heading out for my walkabout. After a long day out I returned only to find him still there and still painting away. I’m not sure how many hours we was out but for sure it was over six. That’s a long time in this cold weather. He must enjoy what he’s doing, or at least enjoy the money coming in.

 

Posted in art, Black & White Photography, Canada, City, Documentary Photography, Downtown, Dundas Square, Toronto, People, Photojournalism, street, Street Photography, Toronto, urban, Urban Photography | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment